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Princeton Audubon Fine Art Prints!

Princeton Audubon is pleased to offer the Rare Prints Edition archival pigment prints. These are exact facsimiles of Audubon's original hand colored engravings. Using ultra high resolution images from top of the line digital cameras the Giclee' printer sprays ink on watercolor paper at up to 4,000 dpi. The result is a reproduction that has the color, detail and texture quality of the original. Each image is printed with archival ink on 330 gram Somerset Velvet Enhanced paper and some with beautiful deckled edges.

Princeton Rare Print Edition Mockingbird


Mockingbird

28 x 39 inches

Princeton Rare-Print Edition

Of this Mockingbird Audubon wrote, "It is where the great magnolia shoots up its majestic trunk, crowned with evergreen leaves, and decorated with a thousand beautiful flowers, that perfume the air around; where the forests and fields are adorned with blossoms of every hue; where the golden orange ornaments the gardens and groves; where bignonias of various kinds interlace their climbing stems around the white-flowered stuartia, and mounting still higher, cover the summits of the lofty trees around, accompanied with innumerable vines, that here and there festoon the dense foliage of the magnificent woods, lending to the vernal breeze a slight portion of the perfume of their clustered flowers; where a genial warmth seldom forsakes the atmosphere; where berries and fruits of all descriptions are met with at every step;--in a word, kind reader, it is where Nature seems to have paused, as she passed over the earth, and opening her stores, to have strewed with unsparing hand the diversified seeds from which have sprung all the beautiful and splendid forms which I should in vain attempt to describe, that the Mocking-bird should have fixed its abode, there only that its wondrous song should be heard."