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AUDUBON PRINTS - BIRDS OF AMERICA & QUADRUPED FINE ART

Princeton Audubon Ltd., As seen in The New York Times & Royal Society of London!

 

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Welcome to Princeton Audubon!  

Make your walls sing!

Princetons began with the purchase of the actual originals which were physically used in the production process. A giant camera with film the same size as the print took a direct-capture picture of the original, and this image was transferred directly to the metal printing plates. There are no other Audubon facsimiles which match the quality of Princeton prints.

PRINCETON AUDUBON EDITION GREAT CAROLINA WREN

Welcome, and thank you for visiting Princeton Audubon Limited. We invite you to invest in what Audubon author William Steiner calls "...simply the finest Audubon facsimiles ever produced." Between 1827 and 1838 John James Audubon produced his original life-size (double elephant) Birds of America. Princeton Audubon Limited purchased these originals in order to accurately reproduce them same-size, these being the world's only direct-camera capture fine art lithographs. Princetons are far beyond common reproductions.The prestigious Royal Society of London, where Audubon himself served as a Fellow, chose Princeton prints for permanent display.That's a jolly good recommendation!  Martha Stewart Living asked to frame and display our Snowy Owl. 

They are true prints, great paper, incredible detail and true colors...simply the finest Audubon facsimiles ever produced!" - Bill Steiner, Audubon print collector and author of Audubon Prints: A Collector's Guide To Every Edition.

"Of all the Audubon reproductions, Princetons come the closest in appearance and quality to the originals." Chris Lane, owner of Philadelphia Print Shop West and guest appraiser on PBS Antiques Roadshow.  More reviews.

Princetons in Gallery 1 were produced by the late David Johnson, a Master Printer and collector of Audubon originals who owned the paramount printing company in the country - Princeton Polychrome Press. This company, now sold, achieved an enviable nationwide reputation by reproducing fine art prints for the National Gallery of Art, National Portrait Gallery, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Detroit Institute of Arts and many more.


Great Carolina Wren - Princeton Audubon Double Elephant Edition •Double elephant (life size - 26 1/4 x 39 1/4) •Limited edition of 1500. •Pencil-numbered and embossed with the Princeton Audubon Limited seal. •Up to 11 color plates used. •Specially developed fade-proof inks. Absolute color fidelity to the actual original. •Printed on a 300 line. •Very heavy archival paper which is recommended by the Library of Congress for archives and is specially toned to match the actual color of the antique originals. •Registered to purchaser. •As seen in New York Times •As permanently displayed at The Royal Society of London, to which Audubon belonged as a Fellow. Absolutely the finest print of this wren ever produced from John James Audubon's originals.

Based on a composition painted in Louisiana or Mississippi in 1822. Audubon's young assistant, Joseph Mason, was the artist who painted the blossoming twig which Audubon identified as a "Dwarf horse chestnut."


 

ORDERING & GUARANTEE:

Order here online, or by phone - 908.510.1621, or by e-mail - audubonart@aol.com
Enter coupon code PRINCETON at checkout for an additional discount.

You may also purchase our prints from The New York Times online store, The Key West Audubon Gallery, The New York Historical Society, and The Taylor Clark Gallery in Baton Rouge.

GUARANTEE: Return prints in original condition in original packaging within 14 days of delivery for a complete refund!


The Carolina wren seems so full of song-clear, strong, yet sweet.  This song consists of loud, rapid triplets, described variously as a spirited three-part tea-kettle, tea-kettle, tea-kettle, or a two-part wheedle, wheedle repeated half a dozen times.   Unlike most other wrens, it is nonmigratory.  Common in the Southeastern United States, it tends to extend its northern ranges after mild winters.  Then, when severe winters return and decimate the ranks, the range limit retracts.

Audubon had his own interpretations of the wren's melodic phrases.  In April 1840 when in Richmond, Virginia, he wrote; "The spring is now fairly open, and this day although quite rainy and sad looking I have seen several Hum birds and heard the ever pleasing note of 'Sweet William' from the Carolina Wren..."  On another occasion he wrote of the bird: "The little fellow droops its tail and sings with great energy a short ditty somewhat resembling the words come-to-me, come-to-me, repeated several times in quick succession, so loud, and yet so mellow, that it is always agreeable to listen to them."