Princeton Audubon Fine Art Prints

The world's only direct camera Audubon prints!

Audubon's Birds of America & Quadrupeds.

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World-class Audubon Fine Art!

Over 60 full-size prints to choose from!

Princeton Audubon is pleased to offer the Rare Prints Edition archival pigment prints. These are exact facsimiles of Audubon's original hand colored engravings. Using ultra high resolution images from top of the line digital cameras the Giclee' printer sprays ink on watercolor paper at up to 4,000 dpi. The result is a reproduction that has the color, detail and texture quality of the original. Each image is printed with archival ink on 330 gram Somerset Velvet Enhanced paper and some with beautiful deckled edges.

Princeton Audubon Rare Print Great Blue Heron


The Great Blue Heron

28 x 39 inches

Princeton Rare-Print Edition

"The State of Louisiana has always been my favourite portion of the Union, although Kentucky and some other States have divided my affections; but as we are on the banks of the fair Ohio, let us pause awhile, good reader, and watch the Heron. In my estimation, few of our waders are more interesting than the birds of this family. Their contours and movements are always graceful, if not elegant. Look on the one that stands near the margin of the pure stream:--see his reflection dipping as it were into the smooth water, the bottom of which it might reach had it not to contend with the numerous boughs of those magnificent trees. How calm, how silent, how grand is the scene! The tread of the tall bird himself no one hears, so carefully does he place his foot on the moist ground, cautiously suspending it for awhile at each step of his progress. Now his golden eye glances over the surrounding objects, in surveying which he takes advantage of the full stretch of his graceful neck. Satisfied that no danger is near, he lays his head on his shoulders, allows the feathers of his breast to droop, and patiently awaits the approach of his finned prey. You might imagine what you see to be the statue of a bird, so motionless is it. But now, he moves; he has taken a silent step, and with great care be advances; slowly does he raise his head from his shoulders, and now, what a sudden start! his formidable bill has transfixed a perch, which he beats to death on the ground. See with what difficulty be gulps it down his capacious throat! and now his broad wings open, and away be slowly flies to another station, or perhaps to avoid his unwelcome observers."  John James Audubon