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AUDUBON PRINTS - BIRDS OF AMERICA & QUADRUPED FINE ART

Princeton Audubon Ltd., As seen in The New York Times & Royal Society of London!

 

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Welcome to Princeton Audubon!  

The Baltimore Oriole

Princetons began with the purchase of the actual originals which were physically used in the production process. A giant camera with film the same size as the print took a direct-capture picture of the original, and this image was transferred directly to the metal printing plates. There are no other Audubon facsimiles which match the quality of Princeton prints.

PRINCETON AUDUBON EDITION BALTIMORE ORIOLE

Welcome, and thank you for visiting Princeton Audubon Limited. We invite you to invest in what Audubon author William Steiner calls "...simply the finest Audubon facsimiles ever produced." Between 1827 and 1838 John James Audubon produced his original life-size (double elephant) Birds of America. Princeton Audubon Limited purchased these originals in order to accurately reproduce them same-size, these being the world's only direct-camera capture fine art lithographs. Princetons are far beyond common reproductions.The prestigious Royal Society of London, where Audubon himself served as a Fellow, chose Princeton prints for permanent display.That's a jolly good recommendation!  Martha Stewart Living asked to frame and display our Snowy Owl. 

They are true prints, great paper, incredible detail and true colors...simply the finest Audubon facsimiles ever produced!" - Bill Steiner, Audubon print collector and author of Audubon Prints: A Collector's Guide To Every Edition.

"Of all the Audubon reproductions, Princetons come the closest in appearance and quality to the originals." Chris Lane, owner of Philadelphia Print Shop West and guest appraiser on PBS Antiques Roadshow.  More reviews.

Princetons in Gallery 1 were produced by the late David Johnson, a Master Printer and collector of Audubon originals who owned the paramount printing company in the country - Princeton Polychrome Press. This company, now sold, achieved an enviable nationwide reputation by reproducing fine art prints for the National Gallery of Art, National Portrait Gallery, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Detroit Institute of Arts and many more.


Baltimore Oriole - Princeton Audubon Double Elephant Edition •Double elephant (life size - 26 1/4 x 39 1/4) •Limited edition of 1500. •Pencil-numbered and embossed with the Princeton Audubon Limited seal. •Up to 11 color plates used. •Specially developed fade-proof inks. Absolute color fidelity to the actual original. •Printed on a 300 line. •Very heavy archival paper which is recommended by the Library of Congress for archives and is specially toned to match the actual color of the antique originals. •Registered to purchaser. •As seen in New York Times •As permanently displayed at The Royal Society of London, to which Audubon belonged as a Fellow. Absolutely the finest print of this Oriole ever produced from John James Audubon's originals.

This print, of two male orioles and a female (shown clinging to the nest), is from a composition painted in Louisiana in 1822 and completed in 1825.  The artist, Joseph Mason, also worked on the background. More than half a century earlier, the Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, in a scientific description of this orange and black American oriole, had named the bird in honor of Cecil Calvert, second Baron of Baltimore, because Lord Baltimore's family colors were also orange and black.

Now known as the northern oriole, its mellow whistle, loud, clear, and rather low-pitched, is a sure sign of the retreat of winter.  The nest is a remarkable example of design and craftsmanship created by the female alone.  First, she ties suspension strings to a long, sweeping branch, forming the warp through which to weave an assortment of plant fibers, milkweed stalks, strips of bark, horse hair, or cord.   The completed structure is gourd shaped, gray colored, and lined with feathers, plant down, or wool.  Audubon noted that in the South the birds built a loosely-woven nest, "in such a manner that the air can easily pass through it," yet, if farther North, "they would have formed it of the warmest and softest materials."


ORDERING & GUARANTEE:

Order here online, or by phone - 908.510.1621, or by e-mail - audubonart@aol.com
Enter coupon code PRINCETON at checkout for an additional discount.

You may also purchase our prints from The New York Times online store, The Key West Audubon Gallery, The New York Historical Society, and The Taylor Clark Gallery in Baton Rouge.

GUARANTEE: Return prints in original condition in original packaging within 14 days of delivery for a complete refund!